Clifford D. Simak

Clifford D. Simak

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Clifford D. Simak
Clifford Simak.jpg
Born Clifford Donald Simak
(1904-08-03)August 3, 1904
Millville, Wisconsin
Died April 25, 1988(1988-04-25) (aged 83)
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Occupation Journalist, popular writer
Nationality American
Period 1931–1986 (fiction)
Genre Science fiction, fantasy
Subject Popular science
Simak's first story, The World of the Red Sun was listed on the cover of Wonder Stories in 1931.
Simak as pictured in Wonder Stories in 1931.

Clifford Donald Simak (/ˈsɪmək/;[1] August 3, 1904 – April 25, 1988) was an American science fiction writer. He won three Hugo Awards and one Nebula Award.[2][3] The Science Fiction Writers of America made him its third SFWA Grand Master,[4] and the Horror Writers Association made him one of three inaugural winners of the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement.[5]

Biography

Early life, education, and journalism career

Simak was born in Millville, Wisconsin in 1904,[3] son of John Lewis and Margaret (Wiseman) Simak. Simak attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison and then taught in the public schools until 1929.[3] He later worked at various newspapers in the Midwest. He began a lifelong association with the Minneapolis Star and Tribune (in Minneapolis, Minnesota) in 1939, which continued until his retirement in 1976. He became Minneapolis Star's news editor in 1949 and coordinator of Minneapolis Tribune's Science Reading Series in 1961.[3]

Personal life

He married Agnes Kuchenberg on April 13, 1929, and they had two children, Richard "Dick" Scott (1947–2012) and Shelley Ellen. In a blurb in Time and Again he wrote, "I have been happily married to the same woman for thirty three years and have two children. My favorite recreation is fishing (the lazy way, lying in a boat and letting them come to me). Hobbies: Chess, stamp collecting, growing roses." He dedicated the book to his wife Kay, "without whom I'd never have written a line". He was well liked by many of his science fiction-writing friends, especially Isaac Asimov.

Death

He died in Minneapolis on 25 April 1988.[3][6][7]

Writing career

The first installment of Simak's Time Quarry was the cover story in the debut issue of Galaxy Science Fiction in 1950.
Simak's novelette "Installment Plan" was the cover story in the February 1959 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction.

Simak became interested in science fiction after reading the works of H. G. Wells as a child. His first contribution to the literature was "The World of the Red Sun", published by Hugo Gernsback in the December 1931 issue of Wonder Stories with one opening illustration by Frank R. Paul.[8] Within a year he placed three more stories in Gernsback's pulp magazines and one in Astounding Stories, then edited by Harry Bates.[8] But his only science fiction publication between 1932 and 1938 was "The Creator" (Marvel Tales #4, March–April 1935), a story with religious implications, which was then rare in the genre.

Once John W. Campbell, at the helm of Astounding from October 1937,[9] began redefining the field, Simak returned and was a regular contributor to Astounding Science Fiction (as it was renamed in 1938)[9] throughout the Golden Age of Science Fiction (1938–1950). At first, as in the 1939 serial novel Cosmic Engineers, he wrote in the tradition of the earlier "super science" subgenre that E. E. "Doc" Smith perfected, but he soon developed his own style, which is usually described as gentle and pastoral.[citation needed] During this period, Simak also published a number of war and western stories in pulp magazines. His best-known book may be City, a fix-up novel based on short stories with a common theme of mankind's eventual exodus from Earth.

Simak continued to produce award-nominated novels throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Aided by a friend, he continued writing and publishing science fiction and, later, fantasy, into his 80s. He believed that science fiction not rooted in scientific fact was responsible for the failure of the genre to be taken seriously, and stated his aim was to make the genre a part of what he called "realistic fiction."

Themes

Simak's stories often repeat a few basic ideas and themes. First and foremost is a setting in rural Wisconsin. A crusty individualistic backwoodsman character literally comes with the territory, the best example being Hiram Taine, the protagonist of The Big Front Yard. Hiram's dog "Towser" (sometimes "Bowser") is another Simak trademark being common to many of Simak's works. But the rural setting is not always as idyllic as here; and in Ring Around the Sun it is largely dominated by intolerance and isolationism.

An idea often found in Simak's stories is that there is no past time for a time traveler to go to. Instead, our world moves along in a stream of time, and to move to a different place in time is to move to another world altogether. Thus in City our Earth is overrun by ants, but the intelligent dogs and the remaining humans escape to other worlds in the time stream. In Ring Around the Sun the persecuted paranormals escape to other Earths which, if they could all be seen at once, would be at different stages of their orbit around the sun, hence the title. In Time is the Simplest Thing a paranormal escapes a mob by moving back in time, only to find that the past is a place where there are no living things and inanimate objects are barely substantial.

Time travel also plays an important role in the ingeniously constructed Time and Again, which then ventures into metaphysics. A long-lost space traveler returns with a message which is SF-slanted yet religious in tone. Having crashed on a planet, he is then nurtured by ethereal duplicates—spirits? souls?—that seem to accompany every sentient being throughout life. His fuddled observations are seized upon by religious factions, and a schism then threatens to erupt into war on Earth.

Intelligence, loyalty and friendship, the existence of God and souls, the unexpected benefits and harm of invention, tools as extensions of humanity, and more questions are often explored by Simak's robots, whom he uses as "surrogate humans".[10] His robots begin as likable mechanical persons, but morph in surprising ways. Having achieved intelligence, robots move onto common themes such as, "Why are we here?" and "Do robots have souls"? Examples are the faithful butler Jenkins in City, the religious robot Hezekiel in A Choice of Gods, the frontier robots in Special Deliverance and A Heritage of Stars, and the monk-like robots in Project Pope who seek Heaven.

Simak's robot-awareness theme goes farthest in All the Traps of Earth. A 600-year-old robot, a family retainer who earned the name Richard Daniel, is considered chattel to be reprogrammed and lose all its memories. The robot runs away, hitches onto a spaceship, and passes through hyperspace unprotected. Daniel gains the ability to see and fix problems in anything—a ship, a robot, a human—telekinetically. Yet he's still drifting and hunted as chattel. Finally he stumbles on a frontier planet and finds a purpose, helping the pioneers as a doctor, a servant, a colonist, and a friend. And here Daniel achieves an epiphany: human beings are more clever than they know. Human-created robots set loose can become agents with para-human abilities that directly or indirectly benefit humanity. Thus do robots, and Mankind, escape "all the traps of earth".

The religious theme is often present in Simak's work, but the protagonists who have searched for God in a traditional sense tend to find something more abstract and inhuman. Hezekiel in A Choice of Gods cannot accept this. Quote: "God must be, forever, a kindly old (human) gentleman with a long, white, flowing beard."

Simak's short stories and longer novellas range from the contemplative and thoughtfully idyllic to pure terror, although the punch line is often characteristically understated, as in Good Night Mr. James and Skirmish. There is also a group of humorous stories, of which "The Big Front Yard" is the most successful. And Way Station is in the midst of all of the science fiction paraphernalia a moving psychological study of a very lonely man who has to make peace with his past and finally manages to do so, but not without personal loss. The contemplative nature of the Simak character is a recurring trait both of theme and of the author's style.

Many of his aliens have a dry, otherworldly sense of humor, and others are unintentionally amusing, either in their speech or their appearance. So too are his robots full of personality, and even his dogs. By contrast, his "heroes" are ciphers. His protagonists are often boring men, never described and never reappearing. They solve crises by muddling through, and if they fall in love with "the girl" (also never described), it's incidental. One of Simak's editors objected to his stories because his heroes were "losers". Simak replied, "I like losers."[11]

One finds other traditional SF themes in Simak's work. The importance of knowledge and compassion in "Immigrant" and "Kindergarten". Identity play, as in "Good Night. Mr James" (filmed as The Outer Limits: The Duplicate Man in 1964). Fictions come to life in "Shadow Show" and elsewhere, such as the novel Out of Their Minds. And there is the revolt of the machines in "Skirmish". And the rather horrifying meeting with an alien world in Beachhead, also known as "You'll Never Go Home Again". (Many of these are in Strangers in the Universe).

Finally, Simak throws in many science-fictional fillips that remain unexplained. Simak's characters encounter alien creatures and concepts they simply cannot understand, and never will. For example, in Special Deliverance, the humans are stalked by The Wailer, which turns out to be a huge wolf-like creature that bellows an infinitely sad howl. They never learn what the creature is, why it seems sad, or how it got there. Simak leaves mysteries hanging in his writing.

Simak himself sums up his life's work in the Foreword to his collection Skirmish. After explaining what themes he avoids—no large-scale alien invasions, no space wars, no empire sagas—he states, "Overall, I have written in a quiet manner; there is little violence in my work. My focus has been on people, not on events. More often than not I have struck a hopeful note... I have, on occasions, tried to speak out for decency and compassion, for understanding, not only in the human, but in the cosmic sense. I have tried at times to place humans in perspective against the vastness of universal time and space. I have been concerned where we, as a race, may be going, and what may be our purpose in the universal scheme—if we have a purpose. In general, I believe we do, and perhaps an important one."

Works

From 1950 to 1986 Clifford Simak wrote over 30 novels plus four non-fiction works with Way Station winning the 1964 Hugo Award. Over 100 of his short stories were published from 1931 to 1981 in the science fiction, western, and war genres with "The Big Front Yard" winning the 1959 Hugo Award for Best Novelette and "Grotto of the Dancing Deer" winning the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Short Story in 1981.[2] One more short story, "I Had No Head and My Eyes Were Floating Way Up in the Air", had been written in 1973 for publication in Harlan Ellison's never-published anthology The Last Dangerous Visions and was first published posthumously in 2015.[12]

One of his short stories, "Good Night, Mr. James", was adapted as "The Duplicate Man" on The Outer Limits in 1964. Simak notes this is a "vicious story — so vicious that it is the only one of my stories adapted to television."[11]

Awards

The Science Fiction Writers of America made Simak its third SFWA Grand Master in 1977, after Robert Heinlein and Jack Williamson.[3][4] In 1987 the Horror Writers Association named him one of three inaugural winners of the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement, with Fritz Leiber and Frank Belknap Long.[5]

Other lifetime awards
Best-of-year literary awards[2]

Books about Clifford D. Simak

  • Muriel R. Becker Clifford D. Simak, a primary and secondary bibliography (1980)
  • Mark Owings The Electric Bibliograph 1: Clifford D. Simak
  • Phil Stephensen-Payne Clifford D. Simak: A Working Bibliography (1991, .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}ISBN 1-871133-28-9)
  • Robert J. Ewald Clifford Simak Reader's Guide to Contemporary Science Fiction and Fantasy Authors Vol. 59 (2006)

Biographical sources

  • Contemporary Authors. New Revision Series. Detroit, Gale Research Co.
  • Sam Moskowitz Seekers of Tomorrow (1967) (one chapter covers Simak)
  • "Obituaries: Clifford D. Simak." Nationwide News Pty Limited - Herald, April 29, 1988.
  • Weatherby, W. J. "Obituary of Clifford Simak, realist of SF." Guardian Newspapers Limited/The Guardian (London), April 29, 1988.

See also

References

  1. ^ "NLS: Say How".
  2. ^ a b c d "Simak, Clifford D." The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index to Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-04-05.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Science Fiction Novelist Clifford D. Simak, 83". The Los Angeles Times. April 29, 1988. p. 46. Retrieved October 22, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ a b "Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master" Archived 2011-07-01 at the Wayback Machine.. Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA). Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  5. ^ a b "Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement". Horror Writers Association (HWA). Retrieved 2013-04-05.
  6. ^ Bramscher, Paul. "Clifford Simak's Biography". Paul Bramscher. Archived from the original on 2011-05-23. Retrieved 2017-03-19.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) (archive.org link)
  7. ^ "Clifford D. Simak, 83, Journalist And Science-Fiction Writer, Dies". The New York Times. 28 Apr 1988. p. D27.
  8. ^ a b Clifford D. Simak at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-05. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  9. ^ a b "Astounding/Analog – Series Bibliography". ISFDB. Retrieved 2013-04-05.
  10. ^ Author's "Foreword" in Skirmish: The Great Short Fiction of Clifford D. Simak.
  11. ^ a b Author's Foreword in Skirmish.
  12. ^ Simak, Clifford D. (October 2015). I Am Crying All Inside and Other Stories. Open Road Integrated Media. pp. 61–82. ISBN 978-1-5040-1267-6.

External links

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford_D._Simak

Brian Stableford

Brian Stableford

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Brian Stableford receiving the award of ActuSF at the 13th Rencontres de l'Imaginaire in Sèvres, France, November the 26th, 2016

Brian Michael Stableford (born 25 July 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 70 novels. His earlier books were published under the name Brian M. Stableford, but more recent ones have dropped the middle initial and appeared under the name Brian Stableford.[1] He has also used the pseudonym Brian Craig for a couple of very early works, and again for a few more recent works. The pseudonym derives from the first names of himself and of a school friend from the 1960s, Craig A. Mackintosh, with whom he jointly published some very early work.[2]

Biography

Born at Shipley, Yorkshire, Stableford graduated with a degree in biology from the University of York in 1969 before going on to do postgraduate research in biology and later in sociology. In 1979 he received a Ph.D. with a doctoral thesis on "The Sociology of Science Fiction". Until 1988, he worked as a lecturer in sociology at the University of Reading. Since then he has been a full-time writer and a part-time lecturer at several universities for classes concerning subjects such as creative writing. He has been married twice, and has a son and a daughter by his first marriage.

Awards and honours

Works

Fiction

Series

Dies Irae
  1. The Days of Glory (Ace 1971)
  2. In the Kingdom of the Beasts (Ace 1971)
  3. Day of Wrath (Ace 1971)
Hooded Swan (a.k.a. Grainger)
  1. The Halcyon Drift (DAW November 1972 / J. M. Dent 1974); also available as an ebook, listed at 58,069 words
  2. Rhapsody in Black (DAW June 1973 / J. M. Dent 1975); also available as an ebook, listed at 51,279 words
  3. Promised Land (DAW February 1974 / J. M. Dent September 1975); also available as an ebook, listed at 49,848 words
  4. The Paradise Game (DAW June 1974 / J. M. Dent 1976); also available as an ebook, listed at 50,303 words
  5. The Fenris Device (DAW December 1974 / Pan 1978); also available as an ebook, listed at 49,782 words
  6. Swan Song (DAW May 1975 / Pan 1978)

All 6 novels are also available in a special omnibus volume: Swan Songs (Big Engine April 2002 / SFBC April 2003)

Daedalus Mission
  1. The Florians (DAW September 1976 / Hamlyn 1978)
  2. Critical Threshold (DAW February 1977 / Hamlyn 1979)
  3. Wildeblood's Empire (DAW October 1977 / Hamlyn 1979)
  4. The City of the Sun (DAW May 1978 / Hamlyn 1980)
  5. Balance of Power (DAW January 1979 / Hamlyn 1984)
  6. The Paradox of the Sets (DAW October 1979)
Asgard
  1. Asgard's Secret (Five Star October 2004); revised and expanded from 2 earlier versions:
    • Journey to the Center (DAW 1982)
    • Journey to the Centre (NEL October 1989)
  2. Asgard's Conquerors (Five Star December 2004); revised and expanded from an earlier version:
    • Invaders from the Centre (NEL January 1990)
  3. Asgard's Heart (Five Star February 2005); revised and expanded from an earlier version:
    • The Centre Cannot Hold (NEL June 1990)
Warhammer
  1. The Orfeo Trilogy:
    • Zaragoz (GW Books November 1989) (as by "Brian Craig")
    • Plague Daemon (GW Books April 1990) (as by "Brian Craig")
    • Storm Warriors (GW Books March 1991) (as by "Brian Craig")
  2. The Wine of Dreams (Black Library October 2000) (as by "Brian Craig")
  3. Warhammer 40000: Pawns of Chaos (Black Library April 2001) (as by "Brian Craig")
David Lydyard (Werewolves)
  1. The Werewolves of London (Simon & Schuster UK July 1990)
  2. The Angel of Pain (Simon & Schuster UK August 1991)
  3. The Carnival of Destruction (Pocket UK October 1994)
Dark Future
  1. Ghost Dancers (GW Books May 1991) (as by "Brian Craig")
Genesys
  1. Serpent's Blood (Legend May 1995)
  2. Salamander's Fire (Legend May 1996)
  3. Chimera's Cradle (Simon & Schuster UK March 1997)
Emortality

The first six volumes are considered the main sequence and were published out of series order; preferred reading order shown below is established from the author's introduction to volume 6, The Omega Expedition. This series is also related to, though not always entirely consistent with, the 8 collections and 3 novels subtitled "Tales of the Biotech Revolution", see below.

The term "emortality", intended to indicate near-immortality as opposed to absolute immortality, is acknowledged by Stableford (in the acknowledgments to volume 3, Dark Ararat) to have been coined by Alvin Silverstein in his 1979 book, Conquest of Death.

In the introduction to his 2007 collection, The Tree of Life and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution, Stableford describes this series as "tracking the potential effects of possible developments in biotechnology on the evolution of global society. [It can be considered] a modified version of the future history mapped out in The Third Millennium: A History of the World AD 2000-3000 (Sidgwick & Jackson 1985, written in collaboration with David Langford).

"The broad sweep of this future history envisages a large-scale economic and ecological collapse in the 21st-century brought about by global warming and other factors, followed by the emergence of a global society designed to accommodate human longevity (although that is not necessarily obvious in stories set in advance of the Crash)."

  1. The Cassandra Complex (Tor March 2001); revised and expanded from:
    • "The Magic Bullet" (nv), Interzone #29 1989
  2. Inherit the Earth (Tor September 1998); revised and expanded from:
    • "Inherit the Earth" (na), Analog July 1995
  3. Dark Ararat (Tor March 2002)
  4. Architects of Emortality (Tor September 1999); revised and expanded from:
    • Les Fleurs du Mal (na) Asimov's October 1994; also, see Collection 19, below
  5. The Fountains of Youth (Tor May 2000); revised and expanded from:
  6. The Omega Expedition (Tor December 2002); revised and expanded from:
    • "And He Not Busy Being Born..." (ss) Interzone #16 Summer 1986
  7. The Dragon Man: A Novel of the Future (Borgo Press 2009); a stand-alone "Young Adult" novel; also available as an e-book, listed at 65,401 words
Mnemosyne
  1. The Wayward Muse (Black Coat Press September 2005) .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}ISBN 1-932983-45-7
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Secret Exhibition" (nv), Weird Tales Fall 1999; revised here, per the author's introduction
    • "The Incubus of the Rose" (ss), Weird Tales Summer 2000; revised here, per the author's introduction
    • "The Arms of Morpheus" (short novel) *
  2. Eurydice's Lament (Black Coat Press Nov. 2015)
  3. The Mirror of Dionysius (Black Coat Press Dec. 2016)
  4. The Pool of Mnemosyne (Black Coat Press April 2018)
The Empire of the Necromancers
  1. The Shadow of Frankenstein (Black Coat Press December 2008) ISBN 978-1-934543-63-4; a fix-up of the following:
  2. Frankenstein and the Vampire Countess (Black Coat Press November 2009) ISBN 978-1-934543-89-4; a fix-up of the following:
    • "The Return of Frankenstein" (na) Tales of the Shadowmen, Volume 4: Lords of Terror, ed. Jean-Marc & Randy Lofficier, Black Coat Press 2008
    • "The Vampire in Paris" (na) Tales of the Shadowmen, Volume 5: The Vampires of Paris, ed. Jean-Marc & Randy Lofficier, Black Coat Press 2009
  3. Frankenstein in London (Black Coat Press January 2011) ISBN 978-1-935558-78-1; a fix-up of the following:
    • "Where Zombies Armies Clash By Night" (na) Tales of the Shadowmen, Volume 6: Grand Guignol, ed. Jean-Marc & Randy Lofficier, Black Coat Press 2010
    • "The Necromancers of London" (na) Tales of the Shadowmen, Volume 7: Femmes Fatales, ed. Jean-Marc & Randy Lofficier, Black Coat Press 2011
Auguste Dupin
  1. "The Legacy of Erich Zann" (na), see Collections 21 & 23, below
  2. The Mad Trist / Valdemar's Daughter (Borgo Press October 2010); billed as "Wildside Double #10"
    • "Valdemar's Daughter: A Romance of Mesmerism" (na) *; also available as an ebook, listed at 30,405 words
    • "The Mad Trist: A Romance of Bibliomania" (na) *; also available as an ebook, listed at 32,787 words
  3. The Quintessence of August: A Romance of Possession (Borgo Press January 2011)
  4. The Cthulhu Encryption: A Romance of Piracy (Borgo Press March 2011)
  5. Journey to the Core of Creation: A Romance of Evolution (Borgo Press November 2011)
  6. Yesterday Never Dies: A Romance of Metempsychosis (Borgo Press January 2013)

Other novels

  • Cradle of the Sun (Ace Double 1969 / Sidgwick & Jackson October 1969)
  • The Blind Worm (Ace Double 1970 / Sidgwick & Jackson March 1970)
  • To Challenge Chaos (DAW May 1972)
  • The Realms of Tartarus (DAW July 1977); a trilogy of short novels, the first of which is slightly revised from the following:
    • The Face of Heaven (Quartet Books February 1976)
  • Man in a Cage (John Day 1975); also available as an e-book, listed at 75,907 words; loosely based on the following story:
    • "Meeting at Eternity" (vi), Proteus #3 1966
  • The Mind-Riders (DAW May 1976 / Fontana 1977)
  • The Last Days of the Edge of the World (Hutchinson 1978 / Ace September 1985)
  • The Walking Shadow (Fontana 1979 / Carroll & Graf July 1985)
  • Optiman (DAW October 1980) / a.k.a. War Games (Pan UK July 1981)
  • The Castaways of Tanagar (DAW April 1981)
  • The Gates of Eden (DAW February 1983)
  • The Empire of Fear (Simon & Schuster UK October 1988); revised and expanded from:
    • "The Man Who Loved the Vampire Lady" (nv), F&SF August 1988
  • Young Blood (Simon & Schuster UK September 1992); also available as an e-book, listed at 129,274 words
  • Firefly: A Novel of the Far Future, (Borgo Press 1994 / Cosmos Books May 2009); also available as an e-book, listed at 52,589 words; revised and expanded from:
    • "Beyond Time's Aegis" (nv), Science Fantasy November 1965 {with Craig A. Mackintosh, as by "Brian Craig"}
  • The Hunger and Ecstasy of Vampires (Mark V. Ziesing March 1996) - first published in somewhat abridged form in the following:
    • "The Hunger and Ecstasy of Vampires" (na), Interzone January 1995 (+1)
  • Year Zero (Sarob Press June 2000 / Five Star April 2003); a fix-up and expansion of the following 3 stories:
    • "When Molly Met Elvis" (ss), Interzone April 1997 (as by "Francis Amery")
    • "Molly and the Angel" (ss), Interzone July 1999 (as by "Francis Amery")
    • "Molly and the Men in Black" (nv), Interzone September 1999 (as by "Francis Amery")
  • The Eleventh Hour (Cosmos Books 2001); also available as an e-book, listed at 106,225 words
  • Curse of the Coral Bride (Immanion Press UK November 2004); loosely based on the following:
    • "The Light of Achernar" (nv), The Last Continent: New Tales of Zothique, ed. John Pelan, ShadowLands Press 1999
  • Kiss the Goat (Prime Books September 2005)
  • The Stones of Camelot (Black Coat Press March 2006) ISBN 1-932983-69-4; revised and expanded from:
    • "The Architect of Worlds" (na), Camelot Fantastic, ed. Lawrence Schimel & Martin H. Greenberg, DAW July 1998
  • Streaking: A Novel of Probability (PS Publishing June 2006 / Borgo Press September 2011)
  • The New Faust at the Tragicomique (Black Coat Press April 2007) ISBN 978-1-932983-91-3
  • Sherlock Holmes and the Vampires of Eternity (Black Coat Press January 2009) ISBN 978-1-934543-06-1; book version of the following linked novellas:
    • "The Hunger and Ecstasy of Vampires" (na), Interzone January 1995 (+1) / (text restored) Mark V. Ziesing 1996, see above
    • "The Black Blood of the Dead" (na), Interzone January 1997 (+1)
    • "The Gateway of Eternity" (na), Interzone January 1999 (+1)
  • The Moment of Truth, (Borgo Press March 2009); loosely based on the following:
    • "The Face of an Angel" (nv), Leviathan 3, ed. Forrest Aguirre & Jeff VanderMeer, Ministry of Whimsy 2002
  • Prelude to Eternity: A Romance of the First Time Machine (Borgo Press August 2009)
  • The World Beyond: A Sequel to S. Fowler Wright's The World Below (Borgo Press September 2009)
  • Alien Abduction: The Wiltshire Revelations (Borgo Press September 2009); "A Comedy of Aliens"
  • Luscinia: A Romance of Nightingales and Roses (Borgo Press August 2010); also available as an e-book, listed at 62,555 words
  • The Plurality of Worlds: A 16th-century Space Opera (Borgo Press 2010); book version of the following linked novellas:
    • "The Ethership" (na), Asimov's August 2006 (as "The Plurality of Worlds")
    • "Doctor Muffet's Island" (na), Asimov's March 2007
    • "The Philosopher's Stone" (na), Asimov's July 2008
    • "The Great Armada" (na), Asimov's April/May 2009; text slightly restored here
  • Zombies Don't Cry: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press February 2011)
  • Xeno's Paradox: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press February 2011) (sequel to "Hidden Agendas", see Collection 9)
  • Nature's Shift: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press September 2011); loosely based on the following:
    • "The Growth of the House of Usher" (nv), Interzone #24 1988
  • Echoes of Eternity (Chambrion Books Feb. 2016)
  • Vampires of Atlantis: A Love Story (Wildside Press April 2016); revised and expanded from the following:
    • "Sheena" (na), The Vampire Sextette, ed. Marvin Kaye, SFBC 2000 / Ace 2002
  • The Darkling Wood: A Scientific Fantasy (Wildside Press May 2016); revised and expanded from the following:
    • "Tenebrio" (nv), Vanishing Acts, ed. Ellen Datlow, Tor 2000
  • The Devil in Detail (Wildside Press May 2016); loosely based on the following related stories:
    • "Chacun sa Goule" (biography & introduction), Dancing with the Dark, ed. Stephen Jones, Vista 1997
    • "The Haunted Bookshop" (nv), Dark Terrors 5: The Gollancz Book of Horror, ed. Stephen Jones & David Sutton, Gollancz UK 2000
    • "Beyond Bliss" (nv), The Haunted Bookshop and Other Apparitions, Borgo Press Sep. 2007
  • Portals of Paradise (Wildside Press Nov. 2016)
  • Tangled Web of Time (Wildside Press Nov. 2016)
  • Further Beyond: A Lovecraftian Science Fiction Novel (Wildside Press Aug. 2017)
  • The Death of Broceliande: A Tale of Faery (Wildside Press Feb. 2018); revised and expanded from the following:
    • "Chanterelle" (nv), Black Heart, Ivory Bones, ed. Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling, Avon 2000
  • Spirits of the Vasty Deep (Snuggly Books March 2018)
  • The Alchemy of Blood (Wildside Press May 2018); revised and expanded from the following:
    • "The Path of Progress" (nv/na), The Return of the Djinn and Other Black Melodramas, Borgo Press Aug. 2009

Chapbooks

  • The Cosmic Perspective/Custer's Last Stand (Chrim Drumm 1985); collection of 2 original novelettes
  • Slumming in Voodooland (Pulphouse Short Story Paperback #26 July 1991); an original short story
  • The Innsmouth Heritage (Necronomicon Press March 1992); an original short story, inspired by H. P. Lovecraft's fiction [4]
  • Fables and Fantasies (Necronomicon Press October 1996); a collection:
    • "Three Versions of a Fable" (vi), Bats and Red Velvet #14 1995
    • "Nephthys" (ss), Peeping Tom #13 1994
    • "The Annual Conference of the Prophets of Atlantis" (vi), Reminiscon 40 Souvenir Programme 1992
    • "The Requiem Masque" (ss), Albedo One #3 1993
    • "Kalamada's Blessing" (vi), Scheherazade #8 1993
    • "Aphrodite and the Ring" (ss), Scheherazade #11 1995
    • "How the Dragons Yetzirah and Alziluth Lost the Knowledge of a Million Lifetimes" (vi) *; revised from Star Roots #1 1989
    • "The Shepherd's Daughter" (ss), Fear! September 1990
    • "The Sleeping Soul" (vi) *
    • "The Dream" (vi) *

Collections

Stableford's prodigious output of short fiction has allowed him to put together the following 22 collections with only one case of overlapping stories between them: "The Legacy of Erich Zann" in both Collections 20 & 22. Collections 1, 3, 6, 8, 13, 16, 19 & 21 are subtitled "Tales of the Biotech Revolution" and are related to, though not always entirely consistent with, his "Emortality" novels, see above.

  1. Sexual Chemistry: Sardonic Tales of the Genetic Revolution (Simon & Schuster UK February 1991); reprinted, sans the concluding article, as Sexual Chemistry and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press 2012)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Bedside Conversations" (ss), Asimov's December 1990
    • "Sexual Chemistry" (nv), Interzone #20 1987 (a.k.a. "A Career in Sexual Chemistry")
    • "Cinderella's Sisters" (ss), The Gate #1 1989
    • "The Magic Bullet" (nv), Interzone #29 1989 (later expanded into The Cassandra Complex, see above)
    • "The Invertebrate Man" (nv), Interzone #39 1990
    • "The Furniture of Life's Ambition" (ss/nv), Zenith 2, ed. David S. Garnett, Orbit UK 1990
    • "The Fury That Hell Withheld" (ss/nv), Interzone #35 1990
    • "The Engineer and the Executioner" (ss), Amazing May 1975; revised
    • "The Growth of the House of Usher" (nv), Interzone #24 1988 (later expanded into Nature's Shift: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution, see above)
    • "And He Not Busy Being Born..." (ss), Interzone #16 1986 (later expanded into The Omega Expedition, see above)
    • "Mankind in the Third Millennium" (article), Social Biology and Human Affairs v54 #1 1988; originally published in Japanese in Japan Research and Technology #249 1988
  2. Complications and Other Stories (Cosmos Books September 2003)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Complications" (nv), Amazing February 1992
    • "Alternate Worlds" (ss), Interzone #38 1990 (a.k.a. "Minimoments")
    • "The Flowers of the Forest" (ss), Amazing June 1993
    • "Layers of Meaning" (ss), Interzone #21 1987
    • "The Oedipus Effect" (nv), Temps Volume 1, ed. Neil Gaiman & Alex Stewart, Roc UK 1991
    • "Sortilege and Serendipity" (nv), Euro Temps, ed. Alex Stewart, Roc UK 1992; sequel to "The Oedipus Effect"
    • "Skinned Alive" (ss), Weekend's Fiction Extra September 1978
    • "Taken for a Ride" (ss), Science Fiction Age March 1994
    • "Virtuous Reality" (ss), Interzone January 1992
    • "Wildland" (ss), Arrows of Eros, ed. Alex Stewart, NEL 1989
  3. Designer Genes: Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Five Star March 2004)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "What Can Chloë Want?" (ss), Asimov's March 1994
    • "The Invisible Worm" (nv), F&SF September 1991
    • "The Age of Innocence" (ss), Asimov's June 1995
    • "Snowball in Hell" (nv), Analog December 2000
    • "The Last Supper" (ss), Science Fiction Age March 2000
    • "The Facts of Life" (nv), Asimov's September 1993
    • "Hot Blood" (ss), Asimov's September 2002
    • "The House of Mourning" (ss), Off-Limits, ed. Ellen Datlow, St. Martin's 1996
    • "Another Branch of the Family Tree" (nv), Asimov's July 1999
    • "The Milk of Human Kindness" (ss), Analog March 2001
    • "The Pipes of Pan" (nv), F&SF June 1997; read online
  4. Salomé and Other Decadent Fantasies (Cosmos Books May 2004)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Salomé" (ss), The Dedalus Book of Femmes Fatales, ed. Brian M. Stableford, Dedalus 1992
    • "O for a Fiery Gloom and Thee" (ss), Sirens and Other Daemon Lovers, ed. Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling, HarperPrism 1998
    • "The Last Worshipper of Proteus" (ss), Beyond Fantasy & Science Fiction #2 1995
    • "The Evil That Men Do" (nv), Realms of Fantasy August 1995
    • "Ebony Eyes" (vi), Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, ed. Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg, Barnes & Noble 1998 (as by "Francis Amery")
    • "The Fisherman's Child" (ss), Penny Dreadful April 1998
    • "The Storyteller's Tale" (ss), The Anthology of Fantasy & the Supernatural, ed. Stephen Jones & David Sutton, Tiger 1994
    • "The Unluckiest Thief" (ss), Interzone June 1992
    • "The Light of Achernar" (nv), The Last Continent: New Tales of Zothique, ed. John Pelan, ShadowLands Press 1999 (later formed loose basis for the novel Curse of the Coral Bride, see above)
    • "The Mandrake Garden" (ss), F&SF July 2000
    • "Chanterelle" (nv), Black Heart, Ivory Bones, ed. Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling, Avon 2000
  5. Sheena and Other Gothic Tales (Immanion Press May 2006), also available as an e-book, approximately 90,000 words
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Rose, Crowned with Thorns" (nv), White of the Moon: New Tales of Madness and Dread, ed. Stephen Jones, Pumpkin Books 1999
    • "Rent" (ss), Weird Tales Fall 1998
    • "Tenebrio" (nv), Vanishing Acts, ed. Ellen Datlow, Tor 2000 (later expanded into the novel The Darkling Wood, see above)
    • "Behind the Wheel" (ss), Dark Voices 2, ed. David Sutton & Stephen Jones, Pan UK 1990
    • "Innocent Blood" (nv), Tales of the Wandering Jew, ed. Brian Stableford, Dedalus UK 1991
    • "Emptiness" (ss), Dreams of Decadence Spring 2001 / Infinity Plus Two, ed. Keith Brooke & Nick Gevers, PS Publishing UK 2003; originally published in French in De Sang d'Encre, ed. Lea Silhol, 1999
    • "The Woman in the Mirror" (ss), The Dedalus Book of Femmes Fatales, ed. Brian Stableford, Dedalus UK 1992; (as by "Brian Craig")
    • "Regression" (nv), Asimov's April 2000
    • "Heartbreaker" (ss), Million #2 1991
    • "Sheena" (na), The Vampire Sextette, ed. Marvin Kaye, SFBC 2000 / Ace 2002; text restored, per the author's introduction (later expanded into the novel Vampires of Atlantis, see above)
  6. The Cure for Love and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press June 2007)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Cure for Love" (nv), Asimov's mid-December 1993
    • "Ashes and Tombstones" (ss), Moon Shots, ed. Peter Crowther, DAW 1999
    • "Slumming in Voodooland" (nv), Pulphouse 1991
    • "The Color of Envy" (nv), Asimov's May 2001
    • "The Lady-Killer, as Observed from a Safe Distance" (nv), Asimov's August 2000
    • "Busy Dying" (nv), F&SF February 1994
    • "The Man Who Invented Good Taste" (ss), Interzone March 1991
    • "The Road to Hell" (nv), Interzone July 1995
    • "The Scream" (nv), Asimov's July 1994
  7. The Haunted Bookshop and Other Apparitions (Borgo Press September 2007)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Seers" (ss), Gothic Ghosts, ed. Wendy Webb & Charles L. Grant, Tor 1997
    • "O Goat-Foot God of Arcady!" (ss), The Silver Web #15 2002
    • Chacun sa Goule (biography & introduction) Dancing with the Dark, ed. Stephen Jones, Vista 1997 (this and the following 2 stories later formed the loose basis for novel The Devil in Detail, see above)
    • "The Haunted Bookshop" (nv), Dark Terrors 5: The Gollancz Book of Horror, ed. Stephen Jones & David Sutton, Gollancz UK 2000
    • "Beyond Bliss" (nv) *; sequel to "The Haunted Bookshop"
    • "All You Inherit" (ss/nv), Taps and Sighs, ed. Peter Crowther, Subterranean Press 2000
    • "The Will" (ss), Dark Fantasies, ed. Chris Morgan, Legend UK 1989
    • "Danny's Inferno" (ss), Albedo One #32 2007
    • "Can't Live Without You" (ss/nv), Oceans of the Mind Winter 2001
    • "Community Service" (nv), Terra Incognita Spring 1997
    • "Denial" (ss) *
  8. The Tree of Life and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press September 2007)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Tree of Life" (nv), Asimov's September 1994
    • "The Skin Trade" (ss), Asimov's November 1995
    • "Out of Touch" (nv), Asimov's October 1995
    • "Skin Deep" (nv), Amazing October 1991
    • "Carriers" (ss/nv), Asimov's July 1993
    • "Rogue Terminator" (nv), Asimov's April 2001
    • "Home Front" (ss), Science Fiction: The DAW 30th Anniversary, ed. Sheila E. Gilbert & Elizabeth R. Wollheim, DAW 2002
    • "Hidden Agendas" (nv/na), Asimov's September 1999 (sequel is Xeno's Paradox: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution, see above)
  9. An Oasis of Horror: Decadent Tales and Contes Cruels (Borgo Press March 2008)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "An Oasis of Horror" (ss), Infinity Plus September 2006; read online
    • "Justice" (ss), Far Point #1 1991
    • "The Copper Cauldron" (nv) *
    • "Nobody Else to Blame" (ss), Redsine #7 January 2002
    • "Heartbeat" (vi), Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, ed. Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg, Barnes & Noble 1998
    • "Upon the Gallows-Tree" (ss), Narrow Houses, ed. Peter Crowther, Little Brown UK 1992
    • "The Devil's Men" (ss), 100 Wicked Little Witch Stories, ed. Stefan Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg, Barnes & Noble 1995
    • "The Elixir of Youth" (nv), Weird Tales #341 August/September 2006; originally appeared in French in Asphodale #4 2003; read online
    • "The Lamia's Soliloquy" (vi), Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, ed. Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg, Barnes & Noble 1998
    • "And the Hunter Home From the Hill" (ss/nv) *
    • "The Riddle of the Sphinx" (vi), Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, ed. Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg, Barnes & Noble 1998
    • "My Mother, the Hag" (ss), Tales of the Round Table, ed. Mike Astley, Past Times 1997
    • "The Devil's Comedy" (nv), Phantoms of Venice, ed. David Sutton, Shadow 2001
    • "The Power of Prayer" (ss), Paradox #1 Spring 2003
  10. The Gardens of Tantalus and Other Delusions (Borgo Press March 2008); also available as an e-book, listed at 67,533 words
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Gardens of Tantalus" (nv), Classical Whodunnits, ed. Mike Astley, Past Times 1996
    • "The Lost Romance" (ss), Chronicles of the Holy Grail, ed. Mike Astley, Carroll & Graf 1996
    • "Lucifer's Comet" (ss), Interzone September 1996 (as by "Francis Amery")
    • "The Miracle of Zunderburg" (ss), Redsine #4 February 2001
    • "The Cult of Selene" (ss), Albedo One #14 1997
    • "Ice and Fire" (ss), Albedo One #18 1998
    • "Self-Sacrifice" (ss), Interzone December 1991 (as by "Francis Amery")
    • "To the Bad" (ss), Weerde: Book 1, ed. Mary Gentle & Roz Kaveney, Roc UK 1992
    • "Riding the Tiger" (nv), Interzone February 1993 (book's introduction explains that this was originally written as a sequel to "To the Bad")
    • "Curiouser and Curiouser: A Kitchen Sink Drama, by Carol Lewis" (ss), Redsine #6 June 2001
    • "Quality Control" (nv), The Mammoth Book of Dracula, ed. Stephen Jones, Robinson 1997
    • "Worse Than the Disease" (ss), Interzone November 1996
  11. The Innsmouth Heritage and Other Sequels (Borgo Press March 2009)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Innsmouth Heritage" (ss), Necronomicon Press 1992
    • "The Picture" (vi), The Seventh Seal #2 2000 / Redsine #2 October 2000 / Here and Now Autumn 2004
    • "The Temptation of Saint Anthony" (ss), The Secret History of Vampires, ed. Darrell Schweitzer, DAW 2007
    • "The Ugly Cygnet, by Hans Realist Andersen" (vi), The Seventh Seal #4 2001
    • "Art in the Blood" (ss/nv), Shadows Over Baker Street, ed. John Pelan & Michael Reeves, Del Rey 2003
    • "Mr Brimstone and Dr. Treacle" (vi), Naked Truth #6 1996 (as by "Francis Amery")
    • "Jehan Thun's Quest" (nv), The Mammoth Book of New Jules Verne Adventures, ed. Mike Astley & Eric Brown, Robinson 2005
    • "The Immortals of Atlantis" (ss), disLocations, ed. Ian Whates, NewCon Press 2007
    • "Between the Chapters" (ss) *
    • "Three Versions of a Fable" (vi), Bats and Red Velvet #14 1995
    • "The Titan Unwrecked; or, Futility Revisited" (nv/na), Tales of the Shadowmen 1: The Modern Babylon, ed. Jean-Marc & Randy Lofficier, Black Coat Press 2005
  12. Changelings and Other Metamorphic Tales (Borgo Press March 2009)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Changelings" (ss), Interzone #85 July 1994
    • "Coming to Terms with the Great Plague" (ss), Omni Online December 1997 (a.k.a. "Coming to Grips with the Great Plague")
    • "Inside Out" (ss/nv), Asimov's March 1997
    • "After the Stone Age" (ss), BBC website March 2004; read original version online
    • "The Oracle" (nv), Asimov's May 1999
    • "The Tour" (ss), Science Fiction Age January 1998
    • "Victims" (ss), Science Fiction Age January 2000
    • "The Serpent" (ss), Interzone September 1995
    • "Tread Softly" (ss), Interzone March 2002
    • "Degrees of Separation (with John B. Ford)" (ss), The Evil Entwines, John B. Ford et. Al., Hardcastle 2002
  13. In the Flesh and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press March 2009)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "In the Flesh" (nv), Future Histories, ed. Stephen McClelland, Horizon House UK 1997; read online
    • "A Chip Off the Old Block" (nv), Postscripts Summer 2004
    • "Taking the Piss" (nv), Asimov's June 2002 / Future Crimes, ed. Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, Ace 2003
    • "Another Bad Day in Bedlam" (ss), Christmas Forever, ed. David G. Hartwell, Tor 1993
    • "Dr. Prospero and the Snake Lady" (ss/nv), Millennium 3001, ed. Russell Davis & Martin H. Greenberg, DAW 2006
    • "Casualty" (nv), Future Weapons of War, ed. Joe Haldeman & Martin H. Greenberg, Baen March 2007
    • "The Trial" (nv), Asimov's July 2007
    • "The Gift of the Magi" (ss), Interzone #122 August 1997
    • "The Incredible Whelk" (ss), Ludd's Mill #16/17 Winter 1980; revised
    • "The Piebald Plumber of Haemlin" (ss), Interzone April 1998
  14. The Cosmic Perspective and Other Black Comedies (Borgo Press July 2009); also available as an e-book, listed at 62,851 words
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Cosmic Perspective" (nv), The Cosmic Perspective/Custer's Last Stand, Drumm 1985
    • "The Haunted Nursery" (vi), Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, ed. Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg, Barnes & Noble 1998
    • "The Phantom of Teirbrun" (na) *
    • "Custer's Last Stand" (nv), The Cosmic Perspective/Custer's Last Stand, Drumm 1985
    • "The Requiem Masque" (ss), Albedo One #3 1993
    • "Meat on the Bone" (nv) *
    • "Murphy's Grail" (ss), Redsine #4 February 2001
    • "Brief Encounter in the Smoking Area" (ss), The Interpreter's House #16 February 2001; read online
    • "Fans from Hell" (ss), The Steel Caves December 2000
    • "The Annual Conference of the Prophets of Atlantis" (vi), Reminiscon 40 Souvenir Programme 1992
  15. The Best of Both Worlds and Other Ambiguous Tales (Borgo Press August 2009)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Best of Both Worlds" (ss), Postscripts Summer 2008
    • "The Highway Code" (ss), We Think, Therefore, We Are, ed. Peter Crowther, DAW 2009
    • "Captain Fagan Died Alone" (ss), The DAW Science Fiction Reader, ed. Donald A. Wollheim, DAW 1976 (falls into the milieu of novel To Challenge Chaos, see above)
    • "The Face of an Angel" (nv), Leviathan 3, ed. Forrest Aguirre & Jeff VanderMeer, Ministry of Whimsy 2002 (later formed loose basis for novel The Moment of Truth, see above)
    • Verstehen (ss) ConFuse '91 program book (Kongressbok) 1991 / Odyssey September 1997; originally published in German in Pilger Dürch Raum und Zeit, ed. Wilfert, Goldmann 1982
    • "The Bad Seed" (nv), Interzone April 1994
    • "The Man Who Came Back" (vi), sf Impulse October 1966
    • "Appearances" (na) *
  16. The Great Chain of Being and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press August 2009); also available as an e-book, listed at 69,250 words
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Following the Pharmers" (nv), Asimov's March 2008
    • "The Unkindness of Ravens" (ss), Interzone #90 December 1994
    • "The Great Chain of Being" (ss), Future Americas, ed. John Helfers & Martin H. Greenberg, DAW 2008
    • "Sleepwalker" (vi), Interzone #105 March 1996
    • "The Beauty Contest" (nv) *
    • "Burned Out" (nv), Interzone #70 April 1993
    • "Inherit the Earth" (na), Analog July 1995 (later expanded into Inherit the Earth, see above)
  17. Beyond the Colors of Darkness and Other Exotica (Borgo Press August 2009); also available as an e-book, listed at 66,814 words
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "Beyond the Colors of Darkness" (ss) *
    • "An Offer of Oblivion" (ss), Amazing October 1974; revised
    • "Enlightenment" (nv) *
    • "The Dragons Alziluth and Yetzirah" (vi), Fables and Fantasies, Necronomicon Press 1996 (revised from Star Roots #1 1989; a.k.a. "How the Dragons Alziluth and Yetzirah Lost the Knowledge of a Million Lifetimes")
    • "A Saint's Progress" (ss) *
    • Mens Sana in Corpore Sano (ss) Violent Spectres #2 1995
    • "Black Nectar" (nv) *
    • "Nephthys" (ss), Peeping Tom #13 1994
    • "Plastic Man" (vi) *; originally appeared in Swedish in Norcon 99 program book, 1999
    • "Aphrodite and the Ring" (ss), Scheherazade #11 1995 (a.k.a. "Aphrodite's Ring")
    • Danse Macabre (na) *
  18. The Return of the Djinn and Other Black Melodramas (Borgo Press August 2009); pre-publication catalogs listed the title of this collection as The Path of Progress and Other Black Melodramas
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Path of Progress" (nv/na) *
    • "Kalamada's Blessing" (vi), Scheherazade #8 1993
    • "The Shepherd's Daughter" (ss), Fear! September 1990
    • "Shadows of the Past" (nv) *
    • "Reconstruction" (vi), Cold Cuts II, ed. Paul Lewis & Steve Lockley, Alun Books 1994
    • "The Return of the Djinn" (na) *
  19. Le Fleurs du Mal / The Undead (Borgo Press August 2010); billed as "Wildside Double #4"
    • Author's Note [to Les Fleurs du Mal] (in) *
    • "Le Fleurs du Mal: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution" (na), Asimov's October 1994; text corrected here, per the author's introduction: "...I eventually decided to finish the novel version of Les Fleurs du Mal anyway, and completed it in 1992. I wrote the story to what seemed its natural length (68,000 words) but could not sell it...I decided to cut the text drastically and attempt to sell an abridged version of the story to one or other of the sf magazines as a novella. The present text is the 29,000-word result of that cut, although Gardner Dozois—who bought it for publication in the October 1994 issue of Asimov's Science Fiction—insisted on cutting out the gratuitous car chase, thus reducing the published version to 27,000 words."; later expanded into the novel Architects of Emortality, see above
    • "The Undead: A Tale of the Biotech Revolution" (short novel) *; also available as an ebook, listed at 44,110 words
  20. The Womb of Time (Perilous Press January 2011)
    • "The Womb of Time" (short novel) *
    • "The Legacy of Erich Zann" (na) *; first story in the Auguste Dupin series, see above
  21. The Golden Fleece and Other Tales of the Biotech Revolution (Borgo Press March 2012)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Golden Fleece" (na) *
    • "Some Like It Hot" (nv), Asimov's December 2009
    • "Alfonso the Wise" (ss), Interzone #105 March 1996 Pas by "Frances Amery")
    • "Next to Godliness" (ss/nv), Celebration: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the British Science Fiction Association, ed. Ian Whates, NewCon Press March 2008; text restored
    • "Mortimer Gray's History of Death" (na), Asimov's April 1995 (later expanded into The Fountains of Youth, see above)
  22. The Legacy of Erich Zann and Other Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos (Borgo Press April 2012)
    • Introduction (in) *
    • "The Legacy of Erich Zann" (na), The Womb of Time, Perilous Press January 2011; first story in the Auguste Dupin series, see above
    • "The Truth about Pickman" (ss), Black Wings: New Tales of Lovecraftian Horror, ed. S. T. Joshi, PS Publishing April 2010
    • "The Holocaust of Ecstasy" (ss), Cthulhu's Reign, ed. Darrell Schweitzer, DAW April 2010
    • "The Seeds from the Mountains of Madness" (na) *

Uncollected short fiction

As translator (predominantly French into English)

As editor

Anthology series

  • Decadence
    • 1 The Daedalus Book of Decadence (Moral Ruins) (1990)
    • 2 The Second Daedalus Book of Decadence: The Black Feast (1992)

Anthologies

  • Tales of the Wandering Jew (1991)
  • The Dedalus Book of British Fantasy: The 19th Century (1991)
  • The Dedalus Book of Femmes Fatales (1992)

Nonfiction

  • The Mysteries of Modern Science (Routledge & Kegan Paul 1977)
  • A Clash of Symbols: The Triumph of James Blish (Borgo Press October 1979) / (Borgo Press August 2008)
  • Masters of Science Fiction: Essays on Six Science Fiction Authors (Borgo Press December 1981)
  • The Science in Science Fiction (Michael Joseph 1982 / Knopf February 1983) (with Peter Nicholls as General Editor and David Langford as fellow Contributor)
  • Future Man: Brave New World or Genetic Nightmare? (Crown October 1984)
  • The Third Millennium: A History of the World AD 2000-3000 (with David Langford) (Sidgwick & Jackson July 1985 / Knopf August 1985)
  • Scientific Romance in Britain, 1890-1950 (Fourth Estate September 1985 / St. Martin's Press November 1985)
  • The Sociology of Science Fiction (Borgo Press April 1987) (Borgo Press September 2007); book version of Stableford's doctoral thesis
  • The Way to Write Science Fiction (Elm Tree Books April 1989)
  • Algebraic Fantasies and Realistic Romances: More Masters of Science Fiction (Borgo Press February 1995) / (Borgo Press September 2007)
  • Opening Minds: Essays on Fantastic Literature (Borgo Press April 1995) / (Borgo Press September 2007)
  • Outside the Human Aquarium: Masters of Science Fiction, Second Edition (Borgo Press September 1995) / (Borgo Press April 2008); Read an excerpt on the fiction of Clark Ashton Smith
  • Writing Fantasy & Science Fiction and Getting Published (Teach Yourself Books December 1997)
  • Glorious Perversity: The Decline and Fall of Literary Decadence (Borgo Press 1998) / (Borgo Press October 2008)
  • Yesterday's Bestsellers: A Voyage through Literary History (Borgo Press May 1998) / (Borgo Press August 2008)
  • The Dictionary of Science Fiction Places (Fireside Books April 1999)
  • Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction Literature (Scarecrow Press June 2004); revised as The A to Z of Science Fiction Literature (Scarecrow Press September 2005)
  • Historical Dictionary of Fantasy Literature (Scarecrow Press July 2005) - see Stableford's note; revised as The A to Z of Fantasy Literature (Scarecrow Press August 2009)
  • Science Fact and Science Fiction: An Encyclopedia (Routledge September 2006)
  • Slaves of the Death Spiders and Other Essays on Fantastic Literature (Borgo Press November 2006); also available as an ebook, listed at 65,566 words
  • Space, Time, and Infinity: Essays on Fantastic Literature (Borgo Press December 2006)
  • Heterocosms and Other Essays on Fantastic Literature (Borgo Press February 2007); also available as an ebook, listed at 89,003 words
  • The Devil's Party: A Brief History of Satanic Abuse (Borgo Press March 2009)
  • Gothic Grotesques: Essays on Fantastic Literature (Borgo Press March 2009)
  • News of the Black Feast and Other Random Reviews (Borgo Press March 2009)
  • Jaunting on the Scoriac Tempests and Other Essays on Fantastic Literature (Borgo Press April 2009)
  • Against the New Gods and Other Essays on Writers of Imaginative Fiction (Borgo Press November 2009)
  • Narrative Strategies in Science Fiction and Other Essays on Imaginative Fiction (Borgo Press December 2009)
  • Exotic Encounters: Selected Reviews (Borgo Press January 2010)
  • Creators of Science Fiction: Essays on Authors, Editors, and Publishers Who Shaped Science Fiction (Borgo Press March 2010)
  • The Decadent World-View: Selected Essays (Borgo Press August 2010)
  • New Atlantis: A Narrative History of Scientific Romance, Vol. 1: The Origins of Scientific Romance (Borgo Press February 2016)
  • New Atlantis: A Narrative History of Scientific Romance, Vol. 2: The Emergence of Scientific Romance (Borgo Press February 2016)
  • New Atlantis: A Narrative History of Scientific Romance, Vol. 3: The Resurgence of Scientific Romance (Borgo Press February 2016)
  • New Atlantis: A Narrative History of Scientific Romance, Vol. 4: The Decadence of Scientific Romance (Borgo Press February 2016)
  • The Plurality of Imaginary Worlds: The Evolution of French Roman Scientifique (Black Coat Press March 2016)

References

  1. ^ DAW 30th Anniversary Science Fiction. Penguin Putnam DAW. 2003. ISBN 0756401372.
  2. ^ "Stableford, Brian M". The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. 19 May 2012. Retrieved 25 May 2012.
  3. ^ "And The Winners Are…", SF&FTA website, 18 June 2011.
  4. ^ Neil Barron, What do I read next?, 2001 : a reader's guide to current genre fiction. Detroit : Gale Group, 2001. ISBN 0787633917 (p.247)

External links

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Stableford

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